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IAS 2023 satellite: Person-centred approaches to address the health needs of people living with HIV



Despite advances made by health systems to improve the care of people living with HIV, a higher burden of multi­morbidity and poorer health-related quality of life are reported by many people living with HIV in comparison to people without HIV. Ensuring the best possible quality of life for those living with and affected by HIV by reducing HIV infections and related morbidity and mortality will only be possible through an integrated response to clients' health needs and preferences. Getting care right for people living with and affected by HIV requires a flexible healthcare system that allows people to decide on their degree of self-management. IAS – the International AIDS Society – organized a satellite session which was held on 24 July 2023 at IAS 2023, the 12th International HIV Science Conference. This satellite session highlighted the latest evidence, promising practices, and reflections on the operationalization of person-centred care principles for HIV. It featured selected publications from the Journal of the International AIDS Society supplement on this topic which was launched at IAS 2023. This session will be of interest to clients, programme planners and implementers, researchers, as well as policy makers. Link to access supplement: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/1...


• Introduction and overview of the key themes of the Journal of the International AIDS Society special issue on person-centred care, Rena JANAMNUAYSOOK, Institute of HIV Research and Innovation, Thailand


• A people-centred approach to enhance the long-term health and well-being of people living with HIV in Europe, Jeffrey V LAZARUS, Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), Spain


• Person-centred dynamic choice prevention in rural Kenya and Uganda: SEARCH SAPPHIRE study, Jane KABAMI, Infectious Diseases Reseach collaboration, Uganda


• Patterns of person-centred communications and provider perspectives to inform the design and implementation of a facility-based improvement intervention in HIV clinics in Zambia, Njekwa MUKAMBA, Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia (CIDRZ), Zambia


• Integrating an electronic client feedback tool into continuous quality improvement processes in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Davina CANAGASABEY, PATH, United States


• Improved clinical outcomes for clients on preferred differentiated ART in Uganda, Esther NKOLO, USAID Uganda, Uganda


• Integrated models of HIV care, hypertension and diabetes treatment in eSwatini and South Africa, Maggie MUNSAMY, Department of Health, South Africa


• Lessons learned from community engagement regarding phylodynamic research with molecular HIV surveillance data in the United States, Brian MINALGA, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, United States


• Shifting the power dynamic in the delivery of adolescent and youth-friendly health services, Tung DOAN, Y+ Global, Vietnam


This Journal of the International AIDS Society supplement was organized by IAS – the International AIDS Society. It was made possible with financial support from Gilead Sciences, as part of their sponsorship of the IAS Person-Centred Care programme. IAS has full control over the all activities and decisions relating to, and forming part of, the IAS Person-Centred Care programme. The content of this supplement is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the International AIDS Society or Gilead Sciences. Gilead Sciences has not had any input into the content of the supplement or the satellite event.


This IAS 2023 satellite was organized by IAS – the International AIDS Society. It was made possible with financial support from ViiV Healthcare. The content of the satellite is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the International AIDS Society or ViiV Healthcare. ViiV Healthcare has not had any input into the content of the supplement or the satellite event.



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