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Availability of screening and treatment for common mental disorders in HIV clinic settings

data from the global International epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) Consortium, 2016–2017 and 2020


Availability of screening and treatment for common mental disorders in HIV clinic settings. data from the global International epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) Consortium, 2016–2017 and 2020
Availability of screening and treatment for common mental disorders in HIV clinic settings. data from the global International epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) Consortium, 2016–2017 and 2020

Introduction

Common mental disorders (CMDs) are highly prevalent among people with HIV. Integrating mental healthcare into HIV care may improve mental health and HIV treatment outcomes. We describe the reported availability of screening and treatment for depression, anxiety and post‐traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at global HIV treatment centres participating in the International epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) Consortium in 2020 and changes in availability at sites in low‐ or middle‐income countries (LMICs) between 2016/2017 and 2020.



Methods

In 2020, 238 sites contributing individual‐level data to the IeDEA Consortium and in 2016/2017 a stratified random sample of IeDEA sites in LMICs were eligible to participate in site surveys on the availability of screening and treatment for CMDs. We assessed trends over time for 68 sites across 27 LMICs that participated in both surveys.

Results

Among the 238 sites eligible to participate in the 2020 site survey, 227 (95%) participated, and mental health screening and treatment data were available for 223 (98%) sites across 41 countries. A total of 95 sites across 29 LMICs completed the 2016/2017 survey. In 2020, 68% of sites were in urban settings, and 77% were in LMICs. Overall, 50%, 14% and 12% of sites reported screening with a validated instrument for depression, anxiety and PTSD, respectively. Screening plus treatment in the form of counselling was available for depression, anxiety and PTSD at 46%, 13% and 11% of sites, respectively. Screening plus treatment in the form of medication was available for depression, anxiety and PTSD at 36%, 11% and 8% of sites, respectively. Among sites that participated in both surveys, screening for depression was more commonly available in 2020 than 2016/2017 (75% vs. 59%, respectively, p = 0.048).

Conclusions

Reported availability of screening for depression increased among this group of IeDEA sites in LMICs between 2016/2017 and 2020. However, substantial gaps persist in the availability of mental healthcare at HIV treatment sites across global settings, particularly in resource‐constrained settings. Implementation of sustainable strategies to integrate mental health services into HIV care is needed.



JIA2-26-e26147
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